The Roads We Take

The other day, I was reading out a short story of Akbar and the wise Birbal to my daughter. On his way back to Agra, Akbar encounters a crossroad and gets confused about which road to take. So, he stops a boy named Mahesh Das (later named as Birbal) and inquires about the road that goes to Agra. The young boy replies that none of these roads go to Agra. Akbar keeps his anger in check and seeks an explanation to which Birbal replies,

“Roads never go anywhere, people do.”

Life is the journey and a lot of it is shaped by the crossroads we encounter and the road we choose to take (if at all we get to choose). Then there are diversions, dead ends and slopes.

We may create grand plans and elaborate goals for our lives not knowing what lies ahead of us. Goals provide a good framework to direct our efforts but problem starts when treat our goals as our destination. I have learned that goals are simply milestones along the unknown path that we are onto. Worry too much about the milestones and you miss the beauty of the journey itself. Be anxious and it robs the joy out of the pursuit.

“Happiness is not a state to arrive at, but a manner of traveling.”

– Margaret Lee Runbeck

Much more fulfilling is to take this journey one step, one day, one moment at a time. To choose our path according to what we truly are and what kind of human being we want to become along the journey. To be driven by a grand purpose that makes a difference. To remain open to possibilities of life. To embrace abundance. To respond to changes in our journey as we encounter them. To slow down and notice things. To wander. To be driven by joy of doing things. To enjoy the ride and every moment within it. To work our way through diversions and get back on track. To evolve and learn from everything that we encounter en route.

Never regret a single moment of the journey. If it wasn’t your destination, it was preparation.

– Unknown

Then, the journey is not just a means to an end – it is the end in itself. Journey is the purpose.



Also Read: The Journey is the Purpose: An Inspiring Tale of Nek Chand Saini at QAspire Blog

From Kalka to Shimla: A Train To The Mountains

For me, journey to the mountains has never been about the height I physically climb, but the depth of experience I receive while traveling. It is said that nature is within us and what we see outside (and the depth of our experiences) is just a manifestation of what lies within us.

On our recent trip to Shimla (in the Himalayan mountain range), we decided to take the toy train journey from Kalka.

It is one of the most sought after train journeys in the country covering about 96 kilometers and offering exotic views along the way. It passes through 20 quaint stations, some 800 bridges and about 120 tunnels. The narrow gauge train line was built in 1903 by Britishers to access Shimla which was then, the Summer capital of the country. This train line is now on UNESCO’s world heritage rail sites.

“When a train goes through a tunnel and it gets dark, you don’t throw away the ticket and jump off. You sit still and trust the engineer.” – Corrie Ten Bloom

As the train ascended to the mountains, crossing dark and long tunnels followed by gorgeous views at every turn, lovely terrains and majestic mountains at a distance shadowed by the clouds, I could not stop thinking about how this trip resembles our own lives. Just like this ride, the journey of our life starts happily, goes through dark phases of struggles followed by good times and this cycle goes on till we reach our destination. When in dark tunnels, we surely could see the light at the end of every tunnel!

Old and colorful small stations along the way offered a refreshing break, although very brief. The air at these stations was crisp, fresh and filled with fragrances of food being served at the stations.

The play of clouds and the mountains was mesmerizing at best with every turn along the way offering spectacular views.

Seeing the distant villages on the mountain slopes and colorful houses made for quite a sight.

Every man has a train of thought on which he rides when he is alone.The dignity and nobility of his life, as well as his happiness, depends upon the direction in which that train is going, the baggage it carries, and the scenery through which it travels. — Joseph Fort Newton

My 9 years old daughter was so fascinated by the scenery that she could not help pulling out her drawing book and start sketching her own version of what she saw from glass window of the train. For me, it was easy to (try and) capture the beauty using my camera but for my daughter, the only tool she had was her own imagination – a gift we are all born with but lose eventually as education takes over.

When we finally reached our destination, seeing so many people at the station, we felt that the journey itself was much more interesting than the destination. And so it is with our lives too.

So, now that you have got onto the train, don’t forget to enjoy the ride!